Family Services

Depression

It’s normal to feel sad sometimes. When the feelings of sadness continue and decrease someone’s ability to enjoy life or to function normally, they may be depressed. Depression is the most common of all the mood disorders. Even very young children can experience it.

Children can become depressed for many reasons. Depression may occur after a death in the family, if there is constant fighting between parents, neglect or abuse, or because the chemicals in the brain that regulate moods are not in balance.

It’s important to detect early signs of depression so treatment can be provided. There are many effective treatments. To learn more about depression, see the links and resources on this site.

If you think that you or someone you know might have depression, talk to your local health care provider. You can also talk to your Community Social Services Worker, wellness counselor or someone else you trust – like a family or community member, or teacher or Elder.

You can call the Kamatsiaqtut Help Line for more support: (867) 979-3333 or toll free at
(800) 265-3333.

In an emergency, contact your local RCMP detachment.

(Resource: Offord Centre for Child Studies – Mood Problems in Children and Adolescents article)


Resources

Mood Problems in Children and Adolescents (Offord Centre PDF)

Links

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health – Depression Fact Sheet

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health – Depressive Illness: An Information Guide

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health – When a Parent Dies By Suicide, What Kids Want to Know

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health – When a Parent Drinks Too Much Alcohol, What Kids Want to Know

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health – When a Parent is Depressed, What Kids Want to Know

Centre of Knowledge on Healthy Child Development

Canadian Mental Health Association

Health and Social Services, Nunavut – Depression

Mind Your Mind -- A place for youth and emerging adults to access info, resources and tools during tough times.

National Institute for Mental Health


Books in Your Community

For Adults

Navigating Teenage Depression: A Guide for Parents and Professionals, Gordon Parker and Kerrie Eyers.

Your Depression Map: Charting Your Own Course Back to Health, Randy Paterson.

For Children and Youth

Hot Stuff to Help Kids Cheer Up, Jerry Wilde.

What to do When You're Sad and Lonely: A Guide for Kids, James Crist.